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Corn Treatment Revisited

By David G. Wolf, NGAP Director
Posted: June 22, 2017

Treatment of corns at National Greyhound Adoption Program and Dutton Road Veterinary Clinic has evolved over the years. The treatment that we are currently using, which is basically a hulling process, has once again been refined. Much of the process remains the same but the use of a scalpel has been included to try and remove as much gristle material as possible, using the theory that the more material we remove, the longer it will take for the corn to return and become a problem once again. As written in our other articles, there are two presentations of corns: one where it is popping out like a bump on the pad and the other being flat, varying in size from a 1/4 in to 5/8 in diameter. Flat corns are more difficult to deal with. Using the new approach, we will take a scalpel to the edge of the corn to slice horizontally underneath

This will permit us to place an elevator into that slice, burrowing down and moving it in multiple directions to open up a pocket.

Using an elevator to dig up corn

We attempt to do as deep as possible but not to the point where we hit blood. If we take the elevator and lift it up we then can slide forceps into the pocket, clamping down to this newly freed gristly material. We use the blade and trim as far back to the outer margin of the corn while pulling up on the forceps.

Pulling the gristle material back

Trimming off corn material

Using the scalpel, we trim the flap off and survey how much gristly material we have left and then use the scalpel to trim the margins. Then we survey the remaining gristle material again and if needed, we horizontally trim more of that gristle material away with the scalpel to try and remove as much gristle as possible.

Corn removed, it could be best described as a small, hard, stone

Trimming margins

At that point, we will dremel the entire surface area and create a nice smooth result. If we do not hit blood during the process, we will not wrap the toe. If we do wrap the toe, we place triple antibiotic non adhering dressing and gauze to try and keep it dry for a few days. At that point we are finished and usually the dog will not limp.

Ready to dremel

Dremeling

Not done yet

Nice and smooth

24 Hours later

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10901 Dutton Road
Philadelphia, PA
19154

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